Flavor of the Geek Cast: Our Podcast for Geeking Out

Audio/Video

While all of us have full-time jobs and have little time, we still like to get together and geek out over stuff. What better-a-way to do that when you live on opposite sides of the country than to create a podcast! Co-hosts Robyn Miller, Muaz Z., and Ben Janca and industry special guests join me in geeking out over games, media, and literature.

After finishing our first season we went on a brief hiatus and currently just upload when we find the time, but a new season will be starting sometime in 2018.

https://soundcloud.com/flavorofthegeekcast

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The Balancing Act: Teaching Openly in the Humanities (Part II)

Education

One of the hardest things about teaching is the acting.

When you have a weekend, or even just a night, where certain situations push you to emotional exhaustion, or even go so far as changing you, putting an eternal dent in your identity. And then, you suddenly find yourself sitting in front of a class, wondering how to bring the pieces of your mind together. How to convince them that you’re okay when a rush of thoughts are occurring in your head, and your heart sinks into your chest. When you have to remain in the present for them, but the sensation of falling is pulling you back towards stagnation. Grief weighs the most when you stop.

Clockwork Empires: Victorian Steampunk at its Finest

Games and Media, Journalism, Portfolio

Victorian dry humor and horror find their way into the gaming universe with Clockwork Empires.

(Article published at Gameranx).

As I sat down to preview Gaslamp’s  Clockwork Empires, I was met by three developers feverishly discussing the Victorian era in all of its opulent historical background. CEO Daniel Jacobsen, Art Director David Baumgart, and Technical Director Nicholas Vining knew their stuff. As an English major I was enthused—sitting in a room of game developers who reminisced on reading Dickens and Tennyson—but I was more intrigued when they told me that all of this was inspiration for their game. Everything from canonical literature, steampunk, ludicrous invention, and even the occult were all used in the game not merely out of the idea of absurdity, but out of an actual historical mindset held in perhaps one of the most long-winded but fascinating literary periods.

The Conventions of Ghosts: The Influences of Nineteenth-Century Nature Writers in a Modern World

Academic, Portfolio

(This piece was part of my graduate research in environmental rhetoric and counter-culture… looking at how literature and media has shaped our modern view of the environment leading into the National Parks movement.)

The nineteenth-century in America was, undeniably, a time of growth. Between the years of 1820 and 1870 the industrial revolution birthed an economy that was threatened by the British.[1]  Railroads expanded across the country and cities began to attract agriculturally-based communities with the promise of fruitful employment.  During this substantial industrial shift, America’s arts culture ultimately shifted as well, introducing the Transcendentalist movement into its literary era. [2]  In short, the Transcendentalist movement was one based around the idea of existentialism and the philosophical concept that humanity is inherently good, but has been corrupted by society.  The cleansing of this corruption, thus, is to venture away from society in order to find the “self”; to look at itself on the inside rather than focus externally on materialism.  Prolific writers such as Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and John Muir fathered this rather historically Romanticized movement.